March 26, 2011 · Posted in Asthma  
Bronchodilators and topical steroid medicines are available in powder containing capsules (Rotacaps) as well as aerosols. This method of administrating medication is most commonly prescribed for poorly co-ordinated patients and for children. Most children over four years old are able to master the technique successfully. (The cleaning instructions that accompany inhalers and Rotahalers should be carefully followed.)
TECHNIQUE FOR USE
1. Remove a Rotacap from its packet and push it firmly into the raised hole on the top of the Rotahaler. The clear end of the Rotacap goes in first. The coloured end of the Rotacap should be even with the top of the hole;
The Rotahaler is now ready for use. Hold the Rotahaler level (horizontally). To split open the Rotacap, turn the light end of the Rotahaler as far as it will go in one firm movement;
Keep the Rotahaler level (horizontal) or the contents of the Rotacap will spill out. Breathe out until your lungs feel comfortably empty. Still keeping the Rotahaler level, raise it to your mouth. Place the mouthpiece between your lips. Close your lips and tilt your head back slightly;
Breathe in as strongly as possible. Hold your breath and take the Rotahaler from your mouth.
*26\148\2*

ASTHMA DEVICES: THE ROTAHALERBronchodilators and topical steroid medicines are available in powder containing capsules (Rotacaps) as well as aerosols. This method of administrating medication is most commonly prescribed for poorly co-ordinated patients and for children. Most children over four years old are able to master the technique successfully. (The cleaning instructions that accompany inhalers and Rotahalers should be carefully followed.)TECHNIQUE FOR USE1. Remove a Rotacap from its packet and push it firmly into the raised hole on the top of the Rotahaler. The clear end of the Rotacap goes in first. The coloured end of the Rotacap should be even with the top of the hole;The Rotahaler is now ready for use. Hold the Rotahaler level (horizontally). To split open the Rotacap, turn the light end of the Rotahaler as far as it will go in one firm movement; Keep the Rotahaler level (horizontal) or the contents of the Rotacap will spill out. Breathe out until your lungs feel comfortably empty. Still keeping the Rotahaler level, raise it to your mouth. Place the mouthpiece between your lips. Close your lips and tilt your head back slightly;Breathe in as strongly as possible. Hold your breath and take the Rotahaler from your mouth.*26\148\2*

    
To assemble the right health care team to ensure you get the best overall care, you must act as coordinator to make sure each practitioner has all the relevant information, and that they communicate with each other as necessary. You must tell each professional who else you are working with and what strategies you are using. If you don’t tell your cardiologist you’ve been seeing a homeopath, you won’t be able to maximize either approach. If your homeopath tries to convince you homeopathic remedies are all you need, and that whatever your cardiologist advises will only interfere with the treatment, you need a different homeopath. Likewise, if your cardiologist has a blanket “quackery” response for any suggestion of complementary methods, you need a different cardiologist. Otherwise, you have many lenses working on your behalf, but they are all looking at their own little piece and never merging into one view. That’s certainly not integrative or complementary or holistic, and you won’t reap all the benefits of coordinated health care.
Conventional medicine has brought us many wonderful medicines and technologies. I wouldn’t want to diagnose or treat low bone density without access to DEXA machines and pharmaceutical options like raloxifene. But I wouldn’t want to do without qi gong or nutritional supplements, either. Both conventional and “alternative” therapies have their limits, and using them in true complementary fashion—according to their strengths and your beliefs and preferences—is the only way to achieve optimal health care and optimal health.
*7\228\2*

THE BONE DENSITY PROGRAM: CHOOSING THE RIGHT PRACTITIONERTo assemble the right health care team to ensure you get the best overall care, you must act as coordinator to make sure each practitioner has all the relevant information, and that they communicate with each other as necessary. You must tell each professional who else you are working with and what strategies you are using. If you don’t tell your cardiologist you’ve been seeing a homeopath, you won’t be able to maximize either approach. If your homeopath tries to convince you homeopathic remedies are all you need, and that whatever your cardiologist advises will only interfere with the treatment, you need a different homeopath. Likewise, if your cardiologist has a blanket “quackery” response for any suggestion of complementary methods, you need a different cardiologist. Otherwise, you have many lenses working on your behalf, but they are all looking at their own little piece and never merging into one view. That’s certainly not integrative or complementary or holistic, and you won’t reap all the benefits of coordinated health care.Conventional medicine has brought us many wonderful medicines and technologies. I wouldn’t want to diagnose or treat low bone density without access to DEXA machines and pharmaceutical options like raloxifene. But I wouldn’t want to do without qi gong or nutritional supplements, either. Both conventional and “alternative” therapies have their limits, and using them in true complementary fashion—according to their strengths and your beliefs and preferences—is the only way to achieve optimal health care and optimal health.*7\228\2*

    
Nervous diarrhoea is frequent loose bowel movements not caused by infection, irritation or food allergy. It can be one urgent movement on waking, or several small movements throughout the day. These can be with or without pain and they can often leave the sufferer exhausted.
Nervous diarrhoea is caused by the nerves to the bowel getting the wrong messages. When the red alert button is pressed and the sympathetic nervous system springs into action, at first the message is to suspend activity in the bowel, but if the message carries on too long and becomes Tm very scared’, instead of, ‘I need to act’, so much adrenalin is poured in that the bowel opens. This is what is happening in nervous diarrhoea – the body is so hyped-up that the bowel cannot relax. Some people have to rush up each morning with diarrhoea – their parasympathetic nervous system is still too active even when they sleep.
Is your bowel responding as though you were running from the charging bull all the time? If so, you are the only one who can do anything about this. The behaviour of your boss, your spouse or worry over money may be your ‘charging bull’ but whatever it is no person or situation can affect your nervous system unless you allow them to do so. As far as relationships go, if you have openly and honestly declared to the person concerned that you find their behaviour to you distressing, then it is up to you after that. If you spend your time trying to make those around you change then you are in for a frustrating time and you deserve diarrhoea. On the other hand if you change your reaction to the stress and look after your body in spite of it, you will realize that far from the action of your bowel being out of your control, you can learn how to restore it to normal functioning.
*61\326\8*

IBS AND THE NERVOUS SYSTEM: NERVOUS DIARRHOEANervous diarrhoea is frequent loose bowel movements not caused by infection, irritation or food allergy. It can be one urgent movement on waking, or several small movements throughout the day. These can be with or without pain and they can often leave the sufferer exhausted.Nervous diarrhoea is caused by the nerves to the bowel getting the wrong messages. When the red alert button is pressed and the sympathetic nervous system springs into action, at first the message is to suspend activity in the bowel, but if the message carries on too long and becomes Tm very scared’, instead of, ‘I need to act’, so much adrenalin is poured in that the bowel opens. This is what is happening in nervous diarrhoea – the body is so hyped-up that the bowel cannot relax. Some people have to rush up each morning with diarrhoea – their parasympathetic nervous system is still too active even when they sleep.Is your bowel responding as though you were running from the charging bull all the time? If so, you are the only one who can do anything about this. The behaviour of your boss, your spouse or worry over money may be your ‘charging bull’ but whatever it is no person or situation can affect your nervous system unless you allow them to do so. As far as relationships go, if you have openly and honestly declared to the person concerned that you find their behaviour to you distressing, then it is up to you after that. If you spend your time trying to make those around you change then you are in for a frustrating time and you deserve diarrhoea. On the other hand if you change your reaction to the stress and look after your body in spite of it, you will realize that far from the action of your bowel being out of your control, you can learn how to restore it to normal functioning.*61\326\8*

    
February 23, 2011 · Posted in Epilepsy  
If you want to try to learn to control your own seizures, the first step is to learn to identify the things that are most likely to precipitate them. It will help you to keep a ‘seizure diary’ for at least a few months; and it will also help your doctor to have a record of your seizures and of what seems to trigger them off.
Best of all is to try the ‘ABC programme, which is the driving force of any programme of behavioural treatment carried out in hospital.
ABC CHARTS
An ABC chart is a detailed record of every seizure, describing what happens immediately before the seizure (A = Antecedents); behaviour (B) during the seizure; and what the consequences (C) of the seizure are for you. All you will need is a special A4 notebook to write your account in – and some honest observation. As well as this, mark every seizure you have on a wall chart or calendar which shows you the years at a glance. If your behavioural programme works, you should be able to watch your seizure frequency fall.
Antecedents
The antecedents of a seizure are particularly important. Try to remember exactly what was happening just before the seizure started. It will help if you ask yourself these questions:
What were you doing just before the seizure/at seizure onset?
How did you feel just before the seizure/at seizure onset?
What were you thinking just before the seizure/at seizure onset?
It is important to be as precise as possible when you are answering these questions. If you can recognize and record your emotions it may help you identify those that may give rise to a seizure. Supposing, for example, that you had been looking at photographs of a previous summer holiday. It is not enough simply to say, ‘I was looking through an old photograph album.’ A more precise answer might have been: ‘I was looking at a picture of Bob and me holding hands. I was feeling a bit sad.’ If you can recall just what you were thinking at the moment the seizure started, so much the better: ‘I was feeling jealous because Bob’s got a new girlfriend now.’ By analysing what happened in this way, you may be able to pinpoint the thoughts or feelings that led directly to the seizure.
Behaviour
You need to note down in as much detail as possible how your behaviour changed at the onset of the seizure. This will be important when you are trying to find a counter measure to inhibit your seizures. For example, the first change in behaviour might have been the movement of a limb, or a thought or a feeling, or perhaps a strange feeling like butterflies in the pit of your stomach which moved up into the chest. To fill in the details you may have to ask someone who was with you at the time. List everything you can.
If you are worried about your behaviour during a seizure – the fact that you may have been incontinent for example – do discuss this with your doctor or someone close to you. Sometimes video monitoring of a seizure can reassure you that whatever aspect of your behaviour in a seizure worries you is not so terrible after all.
Consequences
Consequences are important. Try to note down in detail not only what happened immediately after the seizure, but how it may have changed the situation for you, and also how you felt. People quite often feel despondent, even guilty, about having had another seizure, and, again, if your doctor knows how you feel he can help you tackle these feelings.
If, as a parent, you are trying to keep an ABC chart for a child who has seizures, you may find that consequences are especially significant. The child who has a seizure in class, for example, and is taken out of class and given milk and biscuits by a sympathetic teacher, is being given a strong message – seizures are likely to be rewarded! It is far better to encourage the child to return to the classroom as soon as they have recovered, and to withold the milk and biscuits. But adults too are sometimes ‘rewarded’ by a seizure. If you discover from your chart that you regularly have a seizure after an argument with a partner for example, and always find that he or she is remorseful and attentive towards you afterwards, you could learn something useful!
Interpreting your charts
Once you start looking for links, it is very likely that you will be able to find some sort of relationship between the likelihood of a seizure occurring and your physiological state: whether you were particularly tired or hungry, for example, your emotions, what you were doing, or what was going on in your life with family and friends.
*48\193\2*

CONTROLLING YOUR OWN EPILEPTIC SEIZURES: LOOKING FOR LINKSIf you want to try to learn to control your own seizures, the first step is to learn to identify the things that are most likely to precipitate them. It will help you to keep a ‘seizure diary’ for at least a few months; and it will also help your doctor to have a record of your seizures and of what seems to trigger them off.Best of all is to try the ‘ABC programme, which is the driving force of any programme of behavioural treatment carried out in hospital.ABC CHARTSAn ABC chart is a detailed record of every seizure, describing what happens immediately before the seizure (A = Antecedents); behaviour (B) during the seizure; and what the consequences (C) of the seizure are for you. All you will need is a special A4 notebook to write your account in – and some honest observation. As well as this, mark every seizure you have on a wall chart or calendar which shows you the years at a glance. If your behavioural programme works, you should be able to watch your seizure frequency fall.AntecedentsThe antecedents of a seizure are particularly important. Try to remember exactly what was happening just before the seizure started. It will help if you ask yourself these questions:What were you doing just before the seizure/at seizure onset?How did you feel just before the seizure/at seizure onset?What were you thinking just before the seizure/at seizure onset?It is important to be as precise as possible when you are answering these questions. If you can recognize and record your emotions it may help you identify those that may give rise to a seizure. Supposing, for example, that you had been looking at photographs of a previous summer holiday. It is not enough simply to say, ‘I was looking through an old photograph album.’ A more precise answer might have been: ‘I was looking at a picture of Bob and me holding hands. I was feeling a bit sad.’ If you can recall just what you were thinking at the moment the seizure started, so much the better: ‘I was feeling jealous because Bob’s got a new girlfriend now.’ By analysing what happened in this way, you may be able to pinpoint the thoughts or feelings that led directly to the seizure.BehaviourYou need to note down in as much detail as possible how your behaviour changed at the onset of the seizure. This will be important when you are trying to find a counter measure to inhibit your seizures. For example, the first change in behaviour might have been the movement of a limb, or a thought or a feeling, or perhaps a strange feeling like butterflies in the pit of your stomach which moved up into the chest. To fill in the details you may have to ask someone who was with you at the time. List everything you can.If you are worried about your behaviour during a seizure – the fact that you may have been incontinent for example – do discuss this with your doctor or someone close to you. Sometimes video monitoring of a seizure can reassure you that whatever aspect of your behaviour in a seizure worries you is not so terrible after all.ConsequencesConsequences are important. Try to note down in detail not only what happened immediately after the seizure, but how it may have changed the situation for you, and also how you felt. People quite often feel despondent, even guilty, about having had another seizure, and, again, if your doctor knows how you feel he can help you tackle these feelings.If, as a parent, you are trying to keep an ABC chart for a child who has seizures, you may find that consequences are especially significant. The child who has a seizure in class, for example, and is taken out of class and given milk and biscuits by a sympathetic teacher, is being given a strong message – seizures are likely to be rewarded! It is far better to encourage the child to return to the classroom as soon as they have recovered, and to withold the milk and biscuits. But adults too are sometimes ‘rewarded’ by a seizure. If you discover from your chart that you regularly have a seizure after an argument with a partner for example, and always find that he or she is remorseful and attentive towards you afterwards, you could learn something useful!Interpreting your chartsOnce you start looking for links, it is very likely that you will be able to find some sort of relationship between the likelihood of a seizure occurring and your physiological state: whether you were particularly tired or hungry, for example, your emotions, what you were doing, or what was going on in your life with family and friends.*48\193\2*

    

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