REDUCING YOUR RISK OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE: EATING FOR BETTER HEALTH –HOW TO INTERPRET FOOD LABELS – LABELS FOCUS ON FAT

As you seek out more healthful foods, labels can provide valuable information. Until now, many food labels provided incomplete or misleading nutrition information.
In May 1993, the first parts of food label reform became effective. By May 1994, manufacturers will need to be in full compliance with the new labeling requirements from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).
Before the new regulations, about half of food products had nutrition labels. Now nutrition information should be available for almost all types of packaged foods. The FDA is encouraging voluntary nutrition labeling for fresh foods also. The changes are designed to make food labels more accurate, clear, and useful.
Even with the new regulations that tighten the rules on claims such as “low fat” and “low cholesterol,” the actual figures that show you the amount of calories, fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium are the most helpful. You can use that information, taking into account how much of the product you will actually eat, to plan heart-healthy meals.
Here is a sampling of the changes that pertain directly to heart health.
New labels focus on fat: Labels will be required to show the total amount of fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol in a serving. In addition, the new label shows the number of calories derived from fat (calculated by multiplying the grams of fat by 9—there are 9 calories per gram of fat). Use the information about fat to compare products and to add up the amount of fat you eat on a typical day.
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REDUCING YOUR RISK OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE: EATING FOR BETTER HEALTH –HOW TO INTERPRET FOOD LABELS – LABELS FOCUS ON FATAs you seek out more healthful foods, labels can provide valuable information. Until now, many food labels provided incomplete or misleading nutrition information.In May 1993, the first parts of food label reform became effective. By May 1994, manufacturers will need to be in full compliance with the new labeling requirements from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).Before the new regulations, about half of food products had nutrition labels. Now nutrition information should be available for almost all types of packaged foods. The FDA is encouraging voluntary nutrition labeling for fresh foods also. The changes are designed to make food labels more accurate, clear, and useful.Even with the new regulations that tighten the rules on claims such as “low fat” and “low cholesterol,” the actual figures that show you the amount of calories, fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium are the most helpful. You can use that information, taking into account how much of the product you will actually eat, to plan heart-healthy meals.Here is a sampling of the changes that pertain directly to heart health.New labels focus on fat: Labels will be required to show the total amount of fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol in a serving. In addition, the new label shows the number of calories derived from fat (calculated by multiplying the grams of fat by 9—there are 9 calories per gram of fat). Use the information about fat to compare products and to add up the amount of fat you eat on a typical day.*304\252\8*

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